The Garden of Forgotten Wishes {Book Review}

Trisha Ashley | Bantam Press (2020)

Cozy romance is my guilty pleasure, and I adore all of Trisha Ashley’s books. The Garden of Forgotten Wishes was no exception; sweet, comfortable and satisfying, I’m already sure it will become a favourite re-read!

Perfect for it’s genre, The Garden of Forgotten Wishes was the ideal escapism. Book hygge. Trisha Ashley’s books are all set around the same fictional Lancashire village, so every time I pick one up it’s like returning to see an old friend when you catch glimpses of characters and places from previous books. The villages themselves, the worlds she’s created, are also chocolate box perfect. It’s an idealised, safe, version of reality; the one you wish you could live in. Pure escapism!

Like most cozy romance, everything about The Garden of Forgotten Wishes, from the return to the world of Winter’s End to the familiar unfolding of the plot, is also predictable and safe. There are no big twists or surprises. This is not reading on the edge of your seat. It’s a warm hug of a book.

However, unlike some of Trisha Ashley’s other titles, The Garden of Forgotten Wishes is a slow burner. It’s almost overburdened with world building detail; we savour the process of making homemade ice cream, the colours of the art on the walls, and the developments in the garden. Since the plot is so predictable, and you’re returning to a familiar world, this works. It shouldn’t, it probably wouldn’t in any other kind of book, but here it does. It’s this immersive exploration of a much-loved world which fans crave. I thoroughly enjoyed all the gardening details, the details of village life. That being said, if you hadn’t already fallen in love with this world, I think the pacing might be too slow.

The other thing I love about Trisha Ashley’s books is the characters. Her protagonists are all strong, independent, capable women. They’re rarely young women, which is also a refreshing change of pace. All her characters are imperfectly authentic. They have flaws and back story, and the drama develops from this conflict between character and history. They’re easy to love because they’re ordinary. There’s nothing complex about them, and yet they feel very three dimensional.

All in all, The Garden of Forgotten Wishes was the perfect cozy read, the antidote to the craziness of the world right now and the grey English weather outside. Chocolate box English villages, sweet and slow burning romance. This is the book equivalent of a cup of tea and a biscuit.